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View the feedback we have received on the NTC Consultation RIS - Barriers to the safe use of personal mobility devices paper.

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Option 3, Speed 1, seems like a sensible approach to address the benefits of PMD's, but also keep things safe, however speeds seem low.

A max speed for PMD's capped at 25km/h on flat ground seems unrealistic considering the capability of the existing devices on the market, being able to reach speeds of 30km/h+ depending on rider weight e.g. Boosted skateboards. The issue here is that a large quantity of PMD's on the market would not qualify this requirement, which would leave existing devices in a legal grey area.

Average speeds reached/used on a normal push skateboard and/or scooter can be in the range of 5km/h - 16km/h which are mainly used in pedestrian and shared pedestrian spaces. While 10km/h seems like a nice middle ground, if push skateboards and scooters are able to use these speeds safely already around pedestrians using common sense and safe use, PMD's should be able to be used safely around pedestrians as well at similar speeds, i.e. a maximum of 15km/h.
Yes seems ok, potentially a little on the heavier side.
They should be able to use any device that complies with the proposed PMD framework.

Being able to learn to ride any device safely should be allowable, as it encourages more efficient and environmentally friendly habits and behaviours from a younger age.
The criteria seem ok.
The risk assessments seem ok.
The flexibility of these devices means they are capable of being used across a broad range of road infrastructure, depending on the context of the situation and what is the safest and/or quickest route.
a/ 15 km/h
b/ 30 km/h
c/ 35 km/h

Option 3, Speed 1, seems like a sensible approach to address the benefits of PMD's, but also keep things safe, however speeds seem low.

A max speed for PMD's capped at 25km/h on flat ground seems unrealistic considering the capability of the existing devices on the market, being able to reach speeds of 30km/h+ depending on rider weight e.g. Boosted skateboards. The issue here is that a large quantity of PMD's on the market would not qualify this requirement, which would leave existing devices in a legal grey area.

Average speeds reached/used on a normal push skateboard and/or scooter can be in the range of 5km/h - 16km/h which are mainly used in pedestrian and shared pedestrian spaces. While 10km/h seems like a nice middle ground, if push skateboards and scooters are able to use these speeds safely already around pedestrians using common sense and safe use, PMD's should be able to be used safely around pedestrians as well at similar speeds, i.e. a maximum of 15km/h.
Option 4, Speed Approach 1, with a speed increase of 15 km/h for pedestrian infrastructure and 30km/h for bicycle infrastructure and roads.

A max speed for PMD's capped at 25km/h on flat ground seems unrealistic considering the capability of the existing devices on the market, being able to reach speeds of 30km/h+ depending on rider weight e.g. Boosted skateboards. The issue here is that a large quantity of PMD's on the market would not qualify this requirement, which would leave existing devices in a legal grey area.

Average speeds reached/used on a normal push skateboard and/or scooter can be in the range of 5km/h - 16km/h which are mainly used in pedestrian and shared pedestrian spaces. While 10km/h seems like a nice middle ground, if push skateboards and scooters are able to use these speeds safely already around pedestrians using common sense and safe use, PMD's should be able to be used safely around pedestrians as well at similar speeds, i.e. a maximum of 15km/h.